Blog-within-a-Blog

  • Seven Mistakes Every Church Should Avoid
    Whether you agree with any or all of the "mistakes" mentioned in this article, it is certainly worth the read and can serve as a helpful springboard for discussion on the biblical/theological/historical nature of the Church.
  • Why men have stopped singing in church
    A fascinating discussion is unfolding at churchformen.com regarding the disappearance of singing (especially by men) in most churches with a contemporary bent. Although I consider worship to be much more holistic and diverse than what the author is focused on, the discussion there is nonetheless a worthwhile read.
  • The Anglican-Episcopal Divide Widens Further
    NT Wright offers a honest and somewhat heavy-hearted perspective regarding The Episcopal Church (TEC) in the U.S., and their decision to further formalize their decision to appoint to all orders of ministry, persons in active same-sex relationships. This marks a clear break with the rest of the Anglican Communion.
  • "I Am Second"- Incredible Personal Stories
    Personal testimony stories are a dime-a-dozen on the internet. YouTube and a plethora of other sites offer them. But you will NEVER find striking personal stories about life and loss and struggle and victory and faith like you will encounter at www.iamsecond.com. This is a resource site you MUST visit for yourself and then bookmark.
  • Charles Wesley's secret code diary cracked by priest
    An Anglican priest has unlocked the 270-year-old secrets of Charles Wesley's coded diary, throwing light on the turbulent relationship that he had with his brother John in the early years of the Methodist movement they founded... The “hidden” material offers an insight into Wesley's fierce determination to prevent the Methodist societies from breaking away from the Church of England, and disagreements with his more influential older brother.
Blog powered by Typepad
Member since 08/2003

Technorati

« The Books That Pastors Read | Main | Who's the Real Chris Monroe? »

May 31, 2005

Comments

Feed You can follow this conversation by subscribing to the comment feed for this post.

Very timely, very troubling. Memorial Day weekend and Independence Day weekend are my two least favorite church services of the year because of the uncomfortable mixing of church and state, and pledging our allegiance to something/one other than God.

Extremely troubling. It reminds me of pictures of Third Reich German churches with Swastikas adorning their walls and altars. Last time I checked, we Christians were supposed to worship God, not Caesar.

Peace,

Mike

I agree with Brian Baute. I am so glad my community of faith did not mix church and state. Last year one of our ladies drapped a flag around the cross and I almost threw up. I told our pastor that we should not be doing that. He agreed...we shall see if it happens again this year. If it does I will be pissed yeat again!

I also have a negitive reaction to this picture. I am more interested to hear what a person outside the church thinks of this. I doubt they would even recognize it as a church worship service. Do other countries do this in thier churches?

(oddly?) enough the sermon at my church preached about how we were christians before we were canadians. scary

hey! Wild shot...
I really started feeling this awhile ago and even wrote an article on it (that got me fired!) http://www.opensourcetheology.net/node/391

You are raising an importnat question...

Yah, the picture really does make me convulse. I have nothing constructive to say accept that the line between Christianity and American Nationalism is so freaking blurred it's spooky.

The flag was carried in procession yesterday at our church, in honor of the veterans of all wars, especially those who had given their lives for their country. It's a sort of tradition as we have a number of vets at our parish, but other than that and a nod to "America" as the processional hymn, the flag was returned to its corner of the sanctuary and the day proceded like almost every other sunday, just with different readings from the last.

I see no problem with flags in church, but this picture disturbs me greatly. It's not an acknowledgement, it's a demand. It isn't a mention, it becomes a focal point. It isn't made secondary to the Eucharist, reading of the Bible or even the cross of Christ. It's made primary -- and, imvho, is therefore idolatrous.

But some folks will never accept that.

AAAAAAGGGGGHHHHH!!!!!

:)

Great series of posts. The ol' maxim, "A picture paints a thousand words" rings true. I have to admit, though, that I haven't had a positive reaction to any of them -- and this leaves me wondering, asking myself, why? What picture would paint worship in a truly positive light? The only image that occurs to me is of compassionate care for others ... not a typical congregation led in Sunday service. Still I believe congregational worship is purposeful (and certainly biblical). So I keep waiting to see "the picture" that hints of a beautiful sacrifice to our God. Maybe there are just scales over my eyes ...

Lauren, here is a positive picture for you.... a group of high schoolers washing each others feet. I have done this with every youth group I have ever worked with. Or someone feeding the hungry. Or a group of people around a campfire with a guitar and Gods creation in the background. Frankly, I think the scales on your eyes are falling off, and you are seeing worship as what it is and not what our culture has made it.

Interesting thoughts everyone. Lauren -- it does seem that many of the pics have been responded to negatively (this has surprized me a couple times). However, I'll try to include a couple more that strike at the beautiful and redeeming aspects of evangelical worship. Stay tuned!

The comments to this entry are closed.

Desert Pastor

My Photo